Fast and Furious movies in order: the Fast timeline

What is the timeline of the Fast and Furious movies? Somehow, living life a quarter mile at a time has led the Fast franchise to nine full films, and one spin-off (so far). Along the way, like any series that’s been on the road for 20 years, there have been some detours, disrupting the overall coherence of what’s going on.

Rest easy, though, because we’re experts in untangling over-complicated movie arcs, and making them easy for you to understand. Whether you’re planning to go right back to when Dom Toretto (Vin Diesel) and Brian O’Conner (Paul Walker) first met, want to know the two-or-three essential highlights, or you just want a quick refresher ahead of F9, this piece has you covered.

From the early days of pure drag racing, to the wrecking ball antics of Fast Five, to the heights of Furious 7 and the Fate of the Furious, Hobbs and Shaw going their own way, and some overdue justice for Han, this is the exact order of the Fast and Furious films. Strap in.

What is the correct order of the Fast and Furious movies?

  • The Fast and the Furious
  • 2 Fast, 2 Furious
  • Fast and Furious
  • Fast Five
  • Fast and Furious 6
  • The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift
  • Furious 7
  • The Fate of the Furious
  • Fast and Furious Presents: Hobbs and Shaw

The Fast and the Furious (2001)

Humble beginnings, nobody could foresee what this thriller about illegal street racing was going to start. The FBI enlist LAPD officer Brian to infiltrate the group of drag-racing enthusiasts it believes to be responsible for some high-speed heists that have occurred. In gaining the respect of Toretto, his sister Mia (Jordana Brewster), Letty Ortiz(Michelle Rodriquez), and the others, O’Conner grows to like them, and ultimately decides against arresting Dom.

Simple, effective, early-noughties fender-bending action that lays the foundation for what’s to come.

Suped up cars at the starting line of a drag race

2 Fast, 2 Furious (2003)

Diesel sits out the immediate sequels, and Walker is joined by mainstays Tyrese Gibson and Ludacris for another round of infiltration via dangerously fast sports cars. After letting Dom go, Brian’s found and arrested by authorities in Miami, Florida, and agrees to a plea deal of freedom in exchange for bringing down a drug lord. Brian enlists childhood friend Roman Pearce (Gibson), and the pair earn their pardon through more than a few dents and scrapes.

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Fast and Furious (2009)

This is one of the confusing parts. The Justin Lin-directed fourth movie, Fast and Furious – because 4 Fast, 4 Furious doesn’t quite roll off the tongue – is the third in the chronology, taking place five years after the first. Diesel and Walker are reunited, cementing their places as leaders of the pack, and Gal Gadot is introduced as Gisele Yashar.

Brian, now an FBI agent, helps Dom avenge the apparent death of Letty, by taking down another drug lord, this time Fenix Calderon (Laz Alonso). Things don’t end so neatly this time, with Dom on his way to prison, and Brian quitting the FBI for good.

Fast Five (2011)

The action moves to Brazil, and Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson joins in, for the sequel that’s very much defined the back half of the series. Directly leading on from the previous movie, Dom is broken out of prison, and everyone flees to South America.

Changing to a slightly different lane, Dom, Brian, and Mia pull a good old-fashioned heist – to be perpetrated using designer automobiles, of course – on a corrupt businessman. Hot on their tail is DSS Agent Luke Hobbs (Johnson), who gets a little more than he bargained for in the pursuit.

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Ludacris, Gibson, and Gadot return, and Han Lue (Sung Kang) shows up to capture the hearts of the collective fandom, solidifying the crew as we’ve come to know them. Everything moves at lightning pace, and the set-pieces get preposterous, to the point a bank vault is being swung around Rio De Janeiro like a wrecking ball. A post-credits scene reveals Letty’s still alive, promising a prompt reunion.

Fast and Furious 6 (2013)

Justin Lin’s third sequel on the trot starts widening the cast exponentially. Luke convinces Dom to work with him to capture new baddie Owen Shaw (Luke Evans), under the premise that’ll lead them to Letty.

The crew rallies, Dom manages to find and get through to an amnesiac Letty, and Shaw is defeated in a high-octane, cars-versus-plane sequence on a landing strip. Just another day at the office, until Jason Statham, of The Transporter and Crank fame, pups up for the post-credits scene.

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The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift (2006)

The post-credits scene in Fast and Furious 6 brings us back to the third movie. This is Kang’s actual first appearance as Han Lue, and for the most part, it’s just a rehash of what we’ve seen in The Fast and the Furious, and 2 Fast, 2 Furious, except it’s in Tokyo, Japan. Sliding into a life of crime as a teenager, Sean Boswell (Lucas Black) moves in with his father in Japan to avoid prosecution in the US. He quickly discovers the local drag racing scene, forming relationships, and getting into a spot of bother.

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There’s lots of street racing, the Yakuza are involved, and everything comes down to a race. Dom shows up at the end, because why not, and Deckard (the baddie in the next film) is retroactively shown to have targeted Han at the end of Furious 6, tying everything up into one very frayed little bow.

Furious 7 (2015)

James Wan steps into the director’s chair, and the Fast crew move from Los Angeles to Abu Dhabi, and back again, in one of the most audacious films in the series. Brian and Luke narrowly avoid death at the hands of Deckard Shaw (Jason Statham), and the mysterious Mr. Nobody (Kurt Russell) offers to help Dom, if the sports car aficionados can retrieve God’s Eye, a mass surveillance tool.

It’s a rollercoaster techno-thriller, in which we have Letty and Dom’s proper reunion, the start of Luke and Deckard’s unlikely partnership, and that awe-inspiring jump across the Etihad Towers in a Lykan HyperSport. Paul Walker’s time on the franchise was unceremoniously ended when he passed away towards the end of filming, making the ending one that leaves a real lump in the throat.

A submarine crashing through the ice, kicking up three of a large group of speeding cars

The Fate of the Furious (2017)

The eighth movie has Dom turn his back on his family, thanks to new villain Cipher (Charlize Theron). Turns out, Dom had a child with Elena Neves (Elsa Pataky), his partner before Letty returned, and Cipher has kidnapped Elena and the infant Toretto.

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Dom, Cipher, and the gang play cat-and-mouse for much of the film, wherein Deckard becomes an anti-hero, saving Dom’s kid at the behest of his mother, Magdalene Shaw (Helen Mirren). Mr. Nobody reappears, and the final race is against a nuclear submarine. Only marginally more stressful than a round of Mario Kart.

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Fast and Furious Presents: Hobbs and Shaw (2019)

Finally, the other two bald, muscle-bound men of the franchise get a chance to shine. Deckard and Luke are forced to work together against the superhuman Brixton Lore (Idris Elba), who wants to release an experimental virus on the world.

Luke’s Samoan heritage is the backdrop for the entire third act, and Dwayne’s fellow WWE superstar Roman Reigns has a small role as one of his onscreen family members. Expect that connection to come up again, likewise for Deckard’s sister, Hattie Shaw (Vanessa Kirby). They save the world, because of course they do, and at the end it’s hinted this isn’t the last we’ve seen of Eteon, the organisation that Brixton worked for.

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That’s the Fast and Furious saga as it stands right now. We’ll have to wait for F9 to see exactly where Hobbs and Shaw fits in the grand scheme of things post-Fate. With Fast and Furious 10, a Hobbs and Shaw sequel, and another, unnamed female-led spinoff on the way, life a quarter mile at a time is turning out to be pretty long.

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Anthony McGlynn

Staff writer

Updated: Jun 04, 2021


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