All the James Bond movies in order

Bond in his tuxedo

James Bond will return in… No Time to Die, though we’ve had to wait a little longer than expected. The secret agent, who first hit cinema screens in 1962 (nine years after Ian Fleming’s first Bond novel, Casino Royale, was published), has spent 24 movies defeating supervillains and criminal masterminds. Yet his biggest adversary over the past two years has been a worldwide pandemic, which has seen the latest flick’s release pushed back several times from early 2020 to (currently) September 2021.

The film will no doubt have many familiar elements – stunts, car chases, guns, evil plots, girls, quips, Bond’s stiff-upper-lipped British bosses – but while much has stayed the same for our suave super-spy over the past 60 years, there have been many changes too (and we don’t just mean the lead actor, a more enlightened role for the women, and fewer safari suits).

So get your tuxedo on, dig out your license to kill and join us on a multi-movie mission debriefing full of the vital need-to-know facts about each film.

How to watch all the James Bond movies in order

  • Dr. No
  • From Russia with Love
  • Goldfinger
  • Thunderball
  • You Only Live Twice
  • On Her Majesty’s Secret Service
  • Diamonds Are Forever
  • Live and Let Dies
  • The Man with the Golden Gun
  • The Spy Who Loved Me
  • Moonraker
  • For Your Eyes Only
  • Octopussy
  • A View to a Kill
  • The Living Daylights
  • Licence to Kill
  • GoldenEye
  • Tomorrow Never Dies
  • The World Is Not Enough
  • Die Another Day
  • Casino Royale
  • Quantum of Solace
  • Skyfall
  • Spectre
  • No Time to Die

Dr No and James Bond

Dr. No (1962)

Bond: Sean Connery
Director: Terence Young
Theme song: The Bond theme
Main villain: The metal-handed Dr No, who plans to use radio waves to sabotage a US space mission.
First appearance: M (Bernard Lee); Moneypenny (Lois Maxwell); Felix Leiter; SPECTRE; the gun barrel opening sequence.
Top stunt: A hard-as-nails fisticuffs between Bond driver, Mr Jones.
Memorable for: Ursula Andress as Honey Ryder, emerging from the sea; the trio of assassins known as The Three Blind Mice; a calypso vibe; a cool, sci-fi villain’s base.

Bond in From Russia With Love

From Russia With Love (1963)

Bond: Sean Connery
Director: Terence Young
Theme song: From Russia With Love, performed by Matt Monro (used over the end titles)
Main villain: Donald Grant (Robert Shaw), an assassin hired by SPECTRE to kill Bond in revenge for killing Dr No.
Top stunt: Bond vs Grant train carriage fight.
First appearance: Desmond Llewelyn as Q; Blofeld (uncredited); a pre-credit scene; a “Bond will return in…” credit.
Memorable for: Rosa Klebb going after Bond with a poisoned knife in her shoe.

Bond with a golden woman in Goldfinger

Goldfinger (1964)

Bond: Sean Connery
Director: Guy Hamilton
Theme song: Goldfinger, performed by Shirley Bassey
Main villain: Auric Goldfinger (Gert Fröbe) who plans an audacious heist in Fort Knox.
Top stunt: In the series’ first iconic car chase, Bond’s Aston Martin comes with all kinds of deadly optional extras.
First appearance: The Aston Martin DB5
Memorable for: “No Mr Bond, I expect you to die” – Goldfinger threatening to bisect Bond with a laser; henchman Oddjob, with his blade-brimmed bowler hat; Honor Blackman as Pussy Galore.

Bond wears a jetpack in Thunderball

Thunderball (1965)

Bond: Sean Connery
Director: Terence Young
Theme song: Thunderball, performed by Tom Jones
Main villain: Eyepatch-wearing SPECTRE agent Emilio Largo (Adolfo Celi), who blackmails NATO using their own stolen warheads.
Top stunt: Bond escapes the bad guys using a personal jet pack.
Memorable for: A bad guy disguised as a grieving widow; lots of underwater action; Bond in a red wetsuit; lots of harpooning.

Bloefeld in You Only Live Twice

You Only Live Twice (1967)

Bond: Sean Connery
Director: Lewis Gilbert
Theme song: You Only Live Twice, performed by Nancy Sinatra
Main villain: Ernst Stavro Blofeld (Donald Pleasence), who hijacks US and Soviet space shuttles in an attempt to ignite a war.
Top stunt: The entire sequence with ninjas infiltrating Blofeld’s volcanic lair.
Memorable for: Bond faking his own death; Blofeld’s awesome lair in a volcano; Bond flying an autogyro called Little Nellie.

Bond and his wife in On Her Majesty's Secret Service

On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969)

Bond: George Lazenby
Director: Peter R. Hunt
Theme song: On Her Majesty’s Secret Service
Main villain: Ernst Stavro Blofeld (Telly Savalas), this time pretending to be a therapist in a snowy mountaintop clinic, secretly hypnotising women to become his ‘Angels of Death’.
Top stunt: A bob-sleigh chase.
Memorable for: Bond marrying Tracy di Vicenzo (Diana Rigg) only to have her shot dead in the wedding car; Bond turning to the camera after a girl has run off from him, and saying, “This never happened to the other fella.”

Bond on the moon in Diamonds are forever

Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

Bond: Sean Connery
Director: Guy Hamilton
Theme song: Diamonds are Forever performed, by Shirley Bassey
Main villain: Ernst Stavro Blofeld (Charles Gray), surgically creating clones of himself and using diamonds to power a space weapon.
Best stunt: A car chase in Las Vegas that ends with Bond flipping his car onto two wheels to get through a narrow alleyway (the car exits the alley on the opposite two wheels due to a miscommunication between stunt teams during filming)
Memorable for: Bond on the Moon (sort of… it’s a fake Moon); a car chase involving a moon buggy; Bambi and Thumper, two bodyguards who turn gymnastics into a fighting art; Connery returning to the role.

Bond in Live and Let Die

Live and Let Die (1973)

Bond: Roger Moore
Director: Guy Hamilton
Theme song: Live and Let Die, performed by Wings
Main villain: Dr Kananga (Yaphet Kotto), aka drug lord Mr Big, who plans to flood the US with heroin and create millions of new addicts/customers.
Top stunt: Bond escaping an island by jumping on the backs of crocodiles.
First appearance: Bond in a safari jacket.
Memorable for: A spooky voodoo vibe; tapping into the blaxploitation genre; a henchman with a metal claw hand; a comedy US cop; Moore’s eyebrow-raised quipping – though this film is quite dark in places, Moore’s era would become increasingly silly and ready to jump on cinematic bandwagons.

Bond in the Man With The Golden Gun

The Man with the Golden Gun (1974)

Bond: Roger Moore
Director: Guy Hamilton
Theme song: The Man with the Golden Gun, performed by Lulu
Main villain: Legendary hitman Francisco Scaramanga (Christopher Lee) who wants to pit his skills against the renowned James Bond.
Top stunt: Bond corkscrews a car while leaping a river.
First appearance: Bill Tanner, MI6 chief of staff (who’ll be played by various actors in coming films)
Memorable for: Not being called The Man With Three Nipples (Scaramanga’s other claim to infamy); a theme song perfect for the innuendo of the Moore years (“He has a powerful weapon”); return of the comedy US cop; martial arts action; Nick Nack, Scaramanga’s dwarf manservant.

Bond in The Spy Who Loved Me

The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)

Bond: Roger Moore
Director: Lewis Gilbert
Theme song: Nobody Does it Better, performed by Carly Simon
Main villain: Shipping magnate Karl Stromberg (Curt Jürgens) who wants to drown humanity and create a new world under the sea.
Top stunt: Bond skiing off a cliff, then halting his fall with a Union Jack-emblazoned parachute.
First appearance: Metal-toothed henchman Jaws
Memorable for: A magnificent villain’s lair that looks like a giant metal octopus rising out of the sea; a ship that opens at the front to swallow other ships; the innuendo-drenched last line: “Keeping the British end up, sir.”

Bond in Moonraker

Moonraker (1979)

Bond: Roger Moore
Director: Lewis Gilbert
Theme song: Moonraker, performed by Shirley Bassey
Main villain: Hugo Drax (Michael Lonsdale), whose plan is the same as Karl Stromberg’s only set in space
Top stunt: Bond and Jaws fight on top of a cable car.
Memorable for: Bond in space; Jaws getting a girlfriend; being rushed into production after the success of Star Wars (For Your Eyes Only was supposed to be next); a gondola that turns into hovercraft; a pigeon doing a double take.

Bond in For Your Eyes Only

For Your Eyes Only (1981)

Bond: Roger Moore
Director: John Glen
Theme song: For Your Eyes Only, performed by Sheena Easton
Main villain: Smuggler Aristotle Kristatos (Julian Glover), who’s selling British military secrets to the KGB.
Top stunt: The pre-credit sequence with Bond clinging to a helicopter being remotely controlled by (possibly) Blofeld
Memorable for: Not much, but there’s a lot of water-based action, luxury yachts, and some ice hockey.

Bond dressed as a clown in Octopussy

Octopussy (1983)

Bond: Roger Moore
Director: John Glen
Theme song: All Time High, performed by Rita Coolidge
Main villain: Exiled Afghan prince and backgammon cheat Kamal Khan (Louis Jordan) plans to blow up a German military base using a travelling circus as cover.
Top stunt: Bond leaping from a galloping horse onto a plane, then fighting the villain’s henchman outside the aircraft when it takes flight.
First appearance: Robert Brown as M
Memorable for: Bond as a clown; a fake horse’s arse hiding a mini jet; tennis player Vijay Amritraj as Bond’s tennis racket-welding ally in India.

Bond on the Eiffel Tower In A View A Kill

A View to a Kill (1985)

Bond: Roger Moore
Director: John Glen
Theme song: A View to a Kill, performed by Duran Duran
Main villain: Hi-tech industrialist Max Zorin (Christopher Walken), who plans to destroy Silicon Valley with an earthquake.
Top stunt: Bond chases henchwoman May Day up the Eiffel Tower.
Memorable for: Singer Grace Jones as Mayday; none of Moore’s stunt doubles looking like him; a villain with an airship; Bond driving a fire engine during a car chase; a fight on the suspension struts of the Golden Gate Bridge.

Bond with a Cello in The Living Daylights

The Living Daylights (1987)

Bond: Timothy Dalton
Director: John Glen
Theme song: The Living Daylights, performed by A-ha
Main villain: Double-crossing Soviet General Georgi Koskov (Jeroen Krabbé) and arms dealer Brad Whitaker (Joe Don Baker) stir up the cold war to their own advantage.
Top stunt: Bond and Bond girl Maryam d’Abo escaping baddies using a cello case as a sledge.
First appearance: Caroline Bliss as Moneypenny.
Memorable for: Being an odd (but interesting) hybrid of Moore quippery and the more hard-nosed Bond to come; an excellent pre-credit action scene set on the Rock of Gibraltar; Bond fighting blond henchman Necros while hanging out of the back of a plane.

Helicopters in License To Kill

Licence to Kill (1989)

Bond: Timothy Dalton
Director: John Glen
Theme song: Licence to Kill, performed by Gladys Knight
Main villain: Drug baron Franz Sanchez (Robert Davi), who doesn’t have an evil scheme, exactly, he just annoys Bond.
Top stunt: A car chase along mountainous roads, only with bloody great tankers instead of cars.
Memorable for: Being one of the bleakest Bonds; Felix Leiter is mutilated by a shark; his wife killed on their wedding day; M demands Bond’s resignation when he goes off on a revenge mission; a very icky death when a man explodes in a decompression tank; it’s good, but is it Bond?

Bond and Alex in Goldeneye

GoldenEye (1995)

Bond: Pierce Brosnan
Director: Martin Campbell
Theme song: GoldenEye, performed by Tina Turner
Main villain: Alec Trevelyan, 006 (Sean Bean), a former Double-O agent who faked his own death, founded a criminal organisation and plans to attack Britain using a hijacked Soviet space weapon.
Top stunt: Bond bungee-jumps down a colossal dam wall.
First appearance: Judi Dench as M; Samantha Bond as Moneypenny
Memorable for: Ushering in a Brosnan era of blockbuster stunts and high concept gadgets; a tank chase: a white-knuckle finale fight on the gantry of a ginormous satellite dish (that rises from a lake).

Bond on a bike in Tomorrow Never Dies

Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)

Bond: Pierce Brosnan
Director: Roger Spottiswoode
Theme song: Tomorrow Never Dies, performed by Sheryl Crow
Main villain: Media magnate Elliot Carver (Jonathan Price) who attempts to ignite a war between the UK and China to boost his TV ratings.
Top stunt: Bond on a BMW motorbike chased by a helicopter through the narrow streets of Ho Chi Minh City, ending with an uncomfortably close shave with the ’copter’s blades.
Memorable for: Bond remotely controlling a BMW 750i using his mobile phone; Michelle Yeoh as a truly kick-ass Bond girl, Wai Lin; Carver’s badass stealth boat.

Bond tortured in The World Is Not Enough

The World is Not Enough (1999)

Bond: Pierce Brosnan
Director: Michael Apted
Theme song: The World is Not Enough, performed by Garbage
Main villain: Russian terrorist Victor ‘Renard’ Zokas (Robert Carlyle). Once shot in the head by agent 009 under orders from M, he survived but the bullet remains lodged in his brain, slowly killing him, but making him impervious to pain. He holds a bit of a grudge about this, so he kidnaps M.
Top stunt: A speedboat chase on the Thames showing off the newly built Millennium Dome.
First appearance: John Cleese as R (who becomes Q in the next film)
Memorable for: A helicopter causing carnage with a massive, dangling buzzsaw thing; Denise Richards as Christmas Jones.

Bond fencing in Die Another Day

Die Another DAy (2002)

Bond: Pierce Brosnan
Director: Lee Tamahori
Theme song: Die Another Day, performed by Madonna
Main villain: Gustav Graves (Toby Stephens), a North Korean military colonel apparently killed by Bond, but who underwent DNA replacement therapy to reimagine himself as a European businessman whose company builds a weapon of mass laser destruction.
Top stunt: A car chase on ice.
Memorable for: After a genuinely unsettling first act during which Bond gets tortured, the film goes bonkers – mass laser death from space; Bond fencing with Madonna; an invisible car; Bond kite-surfing a tsunami; Halle Berry as Jinx.

Bond In Casino Royale

Casino Royale (2006)

Bond: Daniel Craig
Director: Martin Campbell
Theme song: You Know My Name, performed by Chris Cornell
Main villain: Banker, terrorist finacier, and poker player extraordinaire Le Chiffre (Mads Mikkelsen) is seriously annoyed when Bond keeps ruining his schemes.
Top stunt: The vertigo-inducing parkour fight on a crane (with Bond chasing a bomber played by Sébastien Foucan, often cited as the creator of Parkour).
Memorable for: Boldly rebooting the franchise with a Bond origin story; introducing Craig as the gnarliest Bond yet; Bond naked and tortured by Chiffre; lots of poker; a poisoned Bond jump-starting his heart; Eva Green as Vesper Lynd.

Bond shoots his gun in Quantum of Solace

Quantum of Solace (2008)

Bond: Daniel Craig
Director: Marc Forster
Theme song: Another Way to Die, performed by Jack White & Alicia Keys
Main villain: ‘Green’ industrialist Dominic Greene (Mathieu Amalric), a member of criminal organisation Quantum, with less than humanitarian designs on a patch of land in Bolivia.
Top stunt: An old-fashioned aeroplane dogfight with a Bond twist when 007 forces the pursuing plane into a deadly game of chicken with a canyon wall.
First appearance: Rory Kinnear as Bill Tanner, MI6 chief of staff.
Memorable for: The opening car chase which finishes with Bond opening the boot to reveal he has the man responsible for Vesper Lynd’s death tied up in there; a chase across the slidey, slate rooftops of Sienna.

Bond and M in Skyfall

Skyfall (2012)

Bond: Daniel Craig
Director: Sam Mendes
Theme song: Skyfall, performed by Adele
Main villain: Raoul Silva (Javier Bardem), a former MI6 agent turned cyber terrorist with a grudge against M and a long game revenge scheme.
Top stunt: Bond driving a digger along a moving freight train.
First appearance: Ralph Fiennes as Gareth Mallory (who becomes the new M); Ben Wishaw as Q; Naomie Harris as Eve Moneypenny
Memorable for: Lots of nods to previous Bond films (it was the 50th anniversary film); the death of M; a bold, exciting reinvention of Moneypenny; and a breathtaking action sequence in the London tube system.

Bond runs along rooftop in Spectre

Spectre (2015)

Bond: Daniel Craig
Director: Sam Mendes
Theme song: Writing’s on the Wall, performed by Sam Smith
Main villain: SPECTRE boss Ernst Stavro Blofeld (Christoph Waltz) – this time revealed to be Bond’s long-lost foster brother (it’s a long story) – hijacks a global surveillance system in order to target secret agents.
Top stunt: Bond chases a car in a rapidly disintegrating plane.
Memorable for: Opening with a four-minute tracking shot following Bond across the rooftops of Mexico City on the Day of the Dead; Judi Dench’s M giving Bond a mission from beyond the grave; the Double-O programme threatened with closure by a new boss (who Bond codenames ‘C’); David Bautista as henchman Mr Hinx.

Alt-Bonds

There have been two unofficial Bond films. The first was Casino Royale (1967), a spy movie spoof starring David Niven as the ‘original’ Bond and Peter Sellers as one of several pretend Bonds.

Like spoofs? Check out our best comedy movies here

Then there was Never Say Never Again (1983), a loose remake of Thunderball in which Connery returns to the role (the film acknowledging his advancing years). Produced by Kevin McClory, a producer on Thunderball who had managed to maintain the screen rights to that novel after a long legal battle, the film is an interesting curio but isn’t particularly memorable beyond that.

If you like Bond you’ll love our list of the best action movies or, if you need a break from all the explosions, check out our best animated movies guide.

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Dave Golder

Updated: Jun 06, 2021


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