Does Princess Diana die in The Crown season 5?

Many world events have been covered in the hit Netflix series, but now we're into the '90s, does Princess die in The Crown season 5?

Elizabeth Debicki as Princess Diana in The Crown season 5

Does Princess Diana die in The Crown season 5? Now that the Netflix series The Crown has reached the ’90s, things are about to really ramp up. The entire decade was a dramatic one for the monarchy, as Diana, Princess of Wales, exposed and challenged Buckingham Palace in the national press.

Of course, anyone who knows their British or royal history knows there’s one event, in particular, hanging over the drama series; Princess Diana’s tragic death in 1997. It was something that shook not just the United Kingdom but the world, as everyone collectively mourned her life cut short.

Diana’s death has been talked about since The Crown started, as many can vividly remember the reports and fallout. So does Princess Diana die in The Crown season 5?

Does Princess Diana die in The Crown season 5?

No, Princess Diana does not die in The Crown season 5. She’s alive and well in The Crown season 5 ending, just after boarding the ship of  Mohamed Al-Fayed for a summer holiday to France. Diana takes the trip with her two sons and her new partner, Dodi Fayed.

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Sadly, this is quite close to when she does pass, happening only months before the car crash that would take both her and Dodi’s lives. At this point in her life, she’d challenged the monarchy publicly in some prolific ways, most notably in an interview with Martin Bashir in 1995.

The show impresses that she was happy before this point, having entered a more fulfilling relationship and breaking free from the royal family. Unfortunately, this doesn’t last too long, but that’s something for The Crown season 6 to handle, although we know they won’t show the car crash.

In a previous statement Netflix released, the streaming service was clear “[Season 6] will not depict the crash, contrary to some reports,” adding that instead, “it will be scenes covering the lead-up to, and [the] aftermath.”