Jessica Jones: 2.06 AKA Facetime

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With a mid-season cliffhanger ending, AKA: Facetime may spell out a turning point for this season of Jessica Jones, but can it pick up momentum to keep us engaged until the end?

To start with, we see a softer side to Jessica in AKA: Facetime with a reconciliation between herself and Oscar which leads to a raunchy but totally impractical sex scene involving a lot of paint - I hope they were water-based because that stuff is hard to get out. Oscar then proceeds to draw Jessica as she sleeps in the morning in a bit of a creepy move. It’s supposed to come off as romantic, but who actually wants a picture of themselves asleep? Is she going to hang that in her office?



Whilst Jessica is leaning into her emotions and starting to connect with others, Malcolm is doing the complete opposite. Perhaps he has been spending a little too much time with Jessica, as Jeri previously suggested. His behaviour at the university, at least, seems to speak directly to this. Malcolm makes a seemingly heartfelt apology to a former girlfriend for how he treated her in the past but while doing so, steals her university pass to gain access to the university’s records. I think Malcolm wants to be a good person, but he also wants to be a good PI - and these two things don’t always go hand in hand. Through his ex-girlfriend though, we’re shown the sort of life that Malcolm was on track to have before Kilgrave intervened, which goes some way to explaining why Malcolm feels so desperate to prove himself now.

On the other hand, Trish has started getting her kicks by using Simpson’s super-drug to go on an SJW crusade which absolutely no-one asked for. She (physically) throws a creepy pervert off a bus in an act of apparent heroism, but this seems to be more in line with quenching her new-found thirst for violence rather than any kind of moral code.  It seems odd that literally no-one has noticed Trish’s dark descent into sordid drug use, especially as those around her have seen this behaviour from her before. I’m surprised that Jessica seemed satisfied with the excuse of food poisoning, leaving Trish on her own at a time where she clearly needs help the most. Unfortunately, this leads the way for hyped-up Trish to seduce (or rather just pounce on) Malcolm, who is more than happy to oblige. I can’t see this ending well at all.

I'd just also like to pick up on the small, but incredibly lazily written character of the pawn shop owner whom Trish and Jessica attempt to get CCTV footage from. His reasoning for not wanting to help them is because he isn't a citizen and he doesn't want to get in trouble with the authorities. Yes he is brown, and yes he has an indistinguishable Middle Eastern accent. Is it possible that we can have foreign figures in TV and cinema whose entire characterisations do not rest on the fact they are not originally from the States? Just a little something to think about...



Finally, leading the way for the most convenient narrative plot point of the season so far, it turns out that IGH may have created a child who can heal others by touching them. No prizes for guessing which unwell individual discovers this information - that’s right, Jeri Hogarth! Ines confides in Jeri that she was actually cured by the miracle child after being attacked by the monster/killer/woman (we still don’t have a consensus on a name for her yet) and let’s just say Jeri is pretty interested. Understatement of the century. My bets are still on Jeri becoming IGH’s latest experiment, but I’m happy to see where this goes.

By the end of the episode, the monster/killer's identity is revealed. There have been several flashing arrows that the killer is someone known to Jessica, but it’s still an unexpected twist when the cat is finally out of the bag. Turns out that Trish has got some serious competition for the Worst Mother Awards - Dorothy Walker or back-from-the-dead-killer-mother? What a choice…

We are now halfway through the season but it seems as though the storyline has been stuck, moving painfully slowly towards this mid-season plot twist. There have been some standout moments, but overall this season seems to be lacking due to the absence of a solid villain character. Nothing is really driving the narrative, and it’s becoming very tricky to see how Rosenberg and co. are going to be able to stretch this out for another six episodes.

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