array(2) { ["siteConfig"]=> array(13) { ["siteUrl"]=> string(29) "https://www.thedigitalfix.com" ["assetsUrl"]=> string(36) "https://www.thedigitalfix.com/minify" ["section"]=> string(10) "television" ["pageUrl"]=> string(85) "https://www.thedigitalfix.com/television/content/3256/the-x-files-revisited-819-alone" ["relativePageUrl"]=> string(56) "/television/content/3256/the-x-files-revisited-819-alone" ["requestPage"]=> string(7) "article" ["requestVertical"]=> string(0) "" ["year"]=> string(4) "2018" ["month"]=> string(2) "10" ["monthName"]=> string(7) "October" ["request"]=> array(3) { ["__page"]=> string(7) "article" ["contentid"]=> string(4) "3256" ["__site"]=> string(28) "television.thedigitalfix.com" } ["taxonomytype"]=> string(0) "" ["taxonomyvalue"]=> string(0) "" } ["content"]=> array(80) { ["site_id"]=> string(28) "television.thedigitalfix.com" ["additional_sections"]=> string(0) "" ["content_id"]=> int(3256) ["content_title"]=> string(33) "The X Files Revisited: 8.19 Alone" ["content_live_date"]=> string(19) "2016-10-25 10:00:00" ["content_update_date"]=> string(19) "2016-10-23 11:15:39" ["content_uid"]=> string(32) "5bfe69bfb56c443311ae82aa9cd16d23" ["content_excerpt"]=> string(136) "The latest 'The X Files Revisited' sees Scully leave the X Files and Doggett gain a new partner as the show transitions into a new era. " ["content_text"]=> string(10046) "The X Files ran for nine seasons and two movies, charting the efforts of Agents Mulder and Scully in their search for the unexplained. And then in 2016, it returned for six new episodes, a mix of mythology and case of the week stories that brought Mulder and Scully back the FBI. From the brilliant Mulder & Scully Meet the Were-Monster to the frantic mythology cliff-hanger in My Struggle II, it was largely viewed as a success and there are hopes that season 10 is just the first of more. In the lead up to the revival, The Digital Fix reviewed the pilot episode and then carried on throughout the series, covering the best and most significant episodes of the show including the first movie The X Files: Fight The Future. Ahead of the two-part season eight finale, comes this nostalgic episode that sees Scully leave the X Files and Doggett gain a new partner...

As I continue the latter run of episodes from season eight I am more convinced that this should have been the end of The X Files. Alone is the last monster of the week episode of Duchovny's run - at least until Mulder & Scully Meet the Were-Monster and it is an episode filled with references to past classic episodes, making it feel like a transition into a new era (Doggett running the X Files without Scully) and a greatest hits tour.

It's the episode where Scully ends her time on the X Files. With Mulder fired from the FBI in the previous episode, this is her turn to depart as her doctor orders her to start her maternity leave now. The scene in the basement office is an incredibly bittersweet moment; she rummages through her desk draw and finds the fused coins from season six's Dreamland and Queequeg's collar, which was the only thing left of her dog after his demise in season three's Quagmire.

image
Then Scully finds the Apollo 11 medallion Mulder gave to her on her birthday in season four's Max. As Scully noted at the time, it is an appreciation that there are extraordinary men and women and extraordinary moments when history leaps forward on the backs of these individuals, that what can be imagined can be achieved. As she leaves the office, she gives Doggett the keychain, the highest admiration she can give, a representation of their teamwork and the fact that she wouldn't have gotten through the last year without him. It really is the end for them as a partnership, when he asks if she is coming back, she smiles but doesn't answer. She would not work on the X Files again in an official capacity for another fifteen years, long after Doggett is gone.

His new partner FBI Agent Leyla Harrison, played by Jolie Jenkins is a fun choice for a one-off X File. She doesn't have the gravitas of the series leads or even the interesting characteristics of the upcoming Reyes but her charm is that she was an accountant with no FBI field experience but an appreciation for all things mysterious. Harrison has been tracking Mulder and Scully's travel expenses for years and is intimately familiar with all their cases. Like Doggett, who spent his first weekend reading up on every case Mulder and Scully ever took, Harrison is an outsider with the knowledge of killer bees and the Flukeman but without the experience.

Tracking a snake-like creature who killed one wheelchair-bound man in the pre-title sequence and taking his adult son Gary, Harrison and Doggett soon find evidence of slime at the crime scene. "You know what? It could be bile." Harrison exclaims with great interest, recalling Mulder and Scully's hunt for Eugene Victor Tooms way back in Squeeze and his demise by escalator in Tooms. “It could be an alien that shed its skin.” she then suggests. “According to Agent Mulder’s case reports they leave behind a mucus-like residue when they…”, a reference to season six's The Beginning. There are some great references and if anything I would have liked more. Named after a dying fan of the show, Harrison is a fan herself and you can feel her gleeful enthusiasm to be finally working on a real-life X File.

image
What's more interesting in this greatest hits tour of The X Files is that for the first half of the episode Mulder and Scully are largely absent. It's incredibly sweet to see Mulder agreeing to help Scully with her antenatal classes (her watches a lot of Oprah now he's unemployed) and it isn't until Harrison and Doggett are attached by the monster and find themselves trapped in tunnels under a large local house that the two former heroes step back in.

As Skinner leads the manhunt for the two missing agents there is the suggestion again (like Three Words) that Doggett isn't up to the role. Scully shows deep concern for her former partner and steps in to do the autopsy of the original victim Arlen Sacks while Mulder launches his own unofficial investigation. It's a mix of a last hurrah for these two agents and a reflection on the huge transition that is happening to the show. Of course Doggett is up to the challenge (and I find it a little frustrating when there is the suggestion that he isn't in these later episodes) but there is a great ensemble feel as Mulder, Scully, Doggett and Harrison all work together to solve this X File.

When Mulder meets the arrogant owner of the house, Dr. Herman Stites (Zach Grenier) I immediately latched on to the idea that if he wasn't controlling the creature, then he was the creature himself. Mulder uses Kersh's name (he is out of the FBI but still a nuisance to the deputy director) while Scully finds the lizard venom evidence in the autopsy and discover that Stites was a crypto-biologist specialising in reptiles. Within the tunnels, blinded by the creature's venom, Harrison displays Mulder's great leap of logic, while Doggett keeps his cool. The three leads certainly display their very best characteristics on this case.

image
The creature is a great monster, a slithering snake like body and insect-like head lurking in the tunnels, blinding and then digesting its victims (it's interesting that Doggett uses the term 'it' when hunting the creature, showing the influence the X Files has already had on him). It would probably been more effective had we seen more of it; not Tooms-like, but perhaps on the level of the Flukeman, digesting its victims. Perhaps it is the playful nature of the episode that keeps the horror at bay. And Stites being the monster is fun but a little silly, though again in keeping with the feel of Alone.

Yet again, Doggett proves himself, shooting the creature as it advances while half blind, a trusting Mulder guiding him even at the risk of being shot himself. The fact that Mulder trusts him with his life is a big step forward for these characters and the show. The final scene is wonderful; Doggett suggests Mulder and Scully give Harrison the Apollo 11 keychain, a momento for her work on the X Files both as an observer and now (however briefly) a live agent. She saves the best question for last, asking Mulder and Scully about an event from the movie hotly debated by fans of The X Files...

"When you went to Antarctica to save Agent Scully from being taken by that spaceship, and you ran out of gas in your Snow-Cat, how did you get back?"

image
It's a great question and seeing Mulder and Scully bicker like a married couple, debating whether it was in fact a spaceship, is a fun moment to end the show on. Doggett watches from amusement, and, like the fans, observes as a huge chapter of The X Files ends. It sums up Alone as a whole; an affectionate back at the show's history, a fun final monster of the week episode for the Duchovny era and another step forward in the show's evolution. Season eight will conclude next with the epic mythology two-parter Essence / Existence , which will change the landscape of The X Files original run forever..." ["content_definition"]=> string(7) "Feature" ["content_tags"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(11) "The X Files" } } ["content_featured"]=> string(1) "1" ["content_link"]=> string(88) "http://television.thedigitalfix.com/content/id/3256/the-x-files-revisited-819-alone.html" ["content_definition_slug"]=> string(7) "feature" ["content_username_slug"]=> string(13) "baz-greenland" ["content_username"]=> string(13) "Baz Greenland" ["publishing_author"]=> string(13) "Baz Greenland" ["publishing_author_slug"]=> string(13) "baz-greenland" ["content_slug"]=> string(31) "the-x-files-revisited-819-alone" ["section"]=> string(10) "television" ["content_href"]=> string(56) "/television/content/3256/the-x-files-revisited-819-alone" ["username"]=> string(13) "Baz Greenland" ["tweet_text"]=> string(0) "" ["contenttype"]=> string(15) "Looking Back..." ["contenttype_slug"]=> string(15) "looking-back..." ["ContentType"]=> string(15) "Looking Back..." ["Explanations"]=> string(0) "" ["PriceDevilIDBluray"]=> string(0) "" ["PriceDevilIDDVD"]=> string(0) "" ["QuizAnswers"]=> string(0) "" ["Restricted_Content"]=> NULL ["SEOExcerpt"]=> string(136) "The latest 'The X Files Revisited' sees Scully leave the X Files and Doggett gain a new partner as the show transitions into a new era. " ["ScoreBreakdown"]=> string(0) "" ["TweetText"]=> string(0) "" ["add_content_linebreaks"]=> string(1) "1" ["add_featured_linebreaks"]=> string(1) "0" ["allow_content_html"]=> string(1) "1" ["allow_featured_html"]=> string(1) "1" ["content_longtext"]=> string(9892) "The X Files ran for nine seasons and two movies, charting the efforts of Agents Mulder and Scully in their search for the unexplained. And then in 2016, it returned for six new episodes, a mix of mythology and case of the week stories that brought Mulder and Scully back the FBI. From the brilliant Mulder & Scully Meet the Were-Monster to the frantic mythology cliff-hanger in My Struggle II, it was largely viewed as a success and there are hopes that season 10 is just the first of more. In the lead up to the revival, The Digital Fix reviewed the pilot episode and then carried on throughout the series, covering the best and most significant episodes of the show including the first movie The X Files: Fight The Future. Ahead of the two-part season eight finale, comes this nostalgic episode that sees Scully leave the X Files and Doggett gain a new partner...

As I continue the latter run of episodes from season eight I am more convinced that this should have been the end of The X Files. Alone is the last monster of the week episode of Duchovny's run - at least until Mulder & Scully Meet the Were-Monster and it is an episode filled with references to past classic episodes, making it feel like a transition into a new era (Doggett running the X Files without Scully) and a greatest hits tour.

It's the episode where Scully ends her time on the X Files. With Mulder fired from the FBI in the previous episode, this is her turn to depart as her doctor orders her to start her maternity leave now. The scene in the basement office is an incredibly bittersweet moment; she rummages through her desk draw and finds the fused coins from season six's Dreamland and Queequeg's collar, which was the only thing left of her dog after his demise in season three's Quagmire.

image
Then Scully finds the Apollo 11 medallion Mulder gave to her on her birthday in season four's Max. As Scully noted at the time, it is an appreciation that there are extraordinary men and women and extraordinary moments when history leaps forward on the backs of these individuals, that what can be imagined can be achieved. As she leaves the office, she gives Doggett the keychain, the highest admiration she can give, a representation of their teamwork and the fact that she wouldn't have gotten through the last year without him. It really is the end for them as a partnership, when he asks if she is coming back, she smiles but doesn't answer. She would not work on the X Files again in an official capacity for another fifteen years, long after Doggett is gone.

His new partner FBI Agent Leyla Harrison, played by Jolie Jenkins is a fun choice for a one-off X File. She doesn't have the gravitas of the series leads or even the interesting characteristics of the upcoming Reyes but her charm is that she was an accountant with no FBI field experience but an appreciation for all things mysterious. Harrison has been tracking Mulder and Scully's travel expenses for years and is intimately familiar with all their cases. Like Doggett, who spent his first weekend reading up on every case Mulder and Scully ever took, Harrison is an outsider with the knowledge of killer bees and the Flukeman but without the experience.

Tracking a snake-like creature who killed one wheelchair-bound man in the pre-title sequence and taking his adult son Gary, Harrison and Doggett soon find evidence of slime at the crime scene. "You know what? It could be bile." Harrison exclaims with great interest, recalling Mulder and Scully's hunt for Eugene Victor Tooms way back in Squeeze and his demise by escalator in Tooms. “It could be an alien that shed its skin.” she then suggests. “According to Agent Mulder’s case reports they leave behind a mucus-like residue when they…”, a reference to season six's The Beginning. There are some great references and if anything I would have liked more. Named after a dying fan of the show, Harrison is a fan herself and you can feel her gleeful enthusiasm to be finally working on a real-life X File.

image
What's more interesting in this greatest hits tour of The X Files is that for the first half of the episode Mulder and Scully are largely absent. It's incredibly sweet to see Mulder agreeing to help Scully with her antenatal classes (her watches a lot of Oprah now he's unemployed) and it isn't until Harrison and Doggett are attached by the monster and find themselves trapped in tunnels under a large local house that the two former heroes step back in.

As Skinner leads the manhunt for the two missing agents there is the suggestion again (like Three Words) that Doggett isn't up to the role. Scully shows deep concern for her former partner and steps in to do the autopsy of the original victim Arlen Sacks while Mulder launches his own unofficial investigation. It's a mix of a last hurrah for these two agents and a reflection on the huge transition that is happening to the show. Of course Doggett is up to the challenge (and I find it a little frustrating when there is the suggestion that he isn't in these later episodes) but there is a great ensemble feel as Mulder, Scully, Doggett and Harrison all work together to solve this X File.

When Mulder meets the arrogant owner of the house, Dr. Herman Stites (Zach Grenier) I immediately latched on to the idea that if he wasn't controlling the creature, then he was the creature himself. Mulder uses Kersh's name (he is out of the FBI but still a nuisance to the deputy director) while Scully finds the lizard venom evidence in the autopsy and discover that Stites was a crypto-biologist specialising in reptiles. Within the tunnels, blinded by the creature's venom, Harrison displays Mulder's great leap of logic, while Doggett keeps his cool. The three leads certainly display their very best characteristics on this case.

image
The creature is a great monster, a slithering snake like body and insect-like head lurking in the tunnels, blinding and then digesting its victims (it's interesting that Doggett uses the term 'it' when hunting the creature, showing the influence the X Files has already had on him). It would probably been more effective had we seen more of it; not Tooms-like, but perhaps on the level of the Flukeman, digesting its victims. Perhaps it is the playful nature of the episode that keeps the horror at bay. And Stites being the monster is fun but a little silly, though again in keeping with the feel of Alone.

Yet again, Doggett proves himself, shooting the creature as it advances while half blind, a trusting Mulder guiding him even at the risk of being shot himself. The fact that Mulder trusts him with his life is a big step forward for these characters and the show. The final scene is wonderful; Doggett suggests Mulder and Scully give Harrison the Apollo 11 keychain, a momento for her work on the X Files both as an observer and now (however briefly) a live agent. She saves the best question for last, asking Mulder and Scully about an event from the movie hotly debated by fans of The X Files...

"When you went to Antarctica to save Agent Scully from being taken by that spaceship, and you ran out of gas in your Snow-Cat, how did you get back?"

image
It's a great question and seeing Mulder and Scully bicker like a married couple, debating whether it was in fact a spaceship, is a fun moment to end the show on. Doggett watches from amusement, and, like the fans, observes as a huge chapter of The X Files ends. It sums up Alone as a whole; an affectionate back at the show's history, a fun final monster of the week episode for the Duchovny era and another step forward in the show's evolution. Season eight will conclude next with the epic mythology two-parter Essence / Existence , which will change the landscape of The X Files original run forever..." 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" ["file_id"]=> string(0) "" ["file_name"]=> NULL ["file_type"]=> string(0) "" ["full_file_url"]=> string(52) "http://television.thedigitalfix.com/file.php?fileid=" ["image"]=> string(74) "/protectedimage.php?image=BazGreenland/The_X_Files_8.19_Alone.jpg_16102016" ["index_title"]=> string(33) "The X Files Revisited: 8.19 Alone" ["misc_float"]=> string(1) "0" ["misc_int"]=> string(1) "0" ["misc_string_1"]=> string(0) "" ["misc_string_2"]=> string(0) "" ["number_of_comments"]=> string(1) "0" ["override_footer"]=> string(1) "0" ["override_header"]=> string(1) "0" ["page_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["page_name"]=> string(7) "Default" ["parent_content_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["parse_content_bbcode"]=> string(1) "1" ["parse_featured_bbcode"]=> string(1) "1" ["path_file_name"]=> string(0) "" ["post_comments"]=> string(1) "1" ["relative_file_url"]=> string(16) "file.php?fileid=" ["show_comments"]=> string(1) "1" ["tag_list"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(11) "The X Files" } } ["title"]=> string(33) "The X Files Revisited: 8.19 Alone" ["update_date"]=> string(16) "23-10-2016 11:15" ["update_user_id"]=> string(6) "100059" ["user_id"]=> string(6) "100059" ["user"]=> array(20) { ["user_id"]=> string(1) "5" ["user_handle"]=> string(13) "baz-greenland" ["forumsid"]=> NULL ["user_email"]=> string(33) "baz.greenland@thedigitalfix.co.uk" ["twitter"]=> string(12) "Bazgreenland" ["facebook"]=> string(58) "https://www.facebook.com/BazGreenlandWriter/?ref=bookmarks" ["googleplus"]=> string(0) "" ["instagram"]=> string(0) "" ["bio"]=> string(464) "I'm the TV Editor for The Digital Fix, so naturally I watch and write about a lot TV! My favourite shows are Buffy, The West Wing and Hannibal but I'm a huge fan of numerous shows and have recently written extensively about Twin Peaks and The X Files, revisiting old episodes as the shows celebrate their revivals. You can also follow me on The X Cast, where I regularly talk all things X Files and on Facebook where you can like my page Baz Greenland Writer." ["user_name"]=> string(13) "Baz Greenland" ["user_role"]=> string(9) "TV Editor" ["avatar_url"]=> string(0) "" ["publishing_author"]=> NULL ["publishing_author_slug"]=> NULL ["content_slug"]=> string(4) "page" ["section"]=> string(0) "" ["content_href"]=> string(15) "//content//page" ["full_json_content"]=> string(4) "null" ["content_text"]=> string(0) "" ["content_live_date"]=> string(19) "1999-02-27 12:00:00" } ["seo_tags"]=> string(12) ",The X Files" ["primaryTags"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(12) { ["tag_slug"]=> string(11) "the-x-files" ["tag"]=> string(11) "The X Files" ["tag_image"]=> string(97) "https://cms.thedigitalfix.com/television/wp-content/uploads/sites/6/2017/07/xfiles-1-1024x576.jpg" ["tag_description"]=> string(436) "Chris Carter's The X Files was the cultural zeitgeist of the 1990s, turning Mulder and Scully into television heroes. With its mix of aliens, conspiracies, monsters and serial killers, it revolutionised cult television and returned for new six-part revival in 2016 and another 10 episodes in 2018. Check out our 'The X Files Revisited', reviewing key episodes from across all seasons and both movies and our weekly reviews of season 11." ["publishing_author"]=> NULL ["publishing_author_slug"]=> NULL ["content_slug"]=> string(4) "page" ["section"]=> string(0) "" ["content_href"]=> string(15) "//content//page" ["full_json_content"]=> string(4) "null" ["content_text"]=> string(0) "" ["content_live_date"]=> string(19) "1999-02-27 12:00:00" } } ["primaryTagContent"]=> array(5) { [0]=> array(23) { ["site_id"]=> string(28) "television.thedigitalfix.com" ["content_featured"]=> string(1) "1" ["additional_sections"]=> string(0) "" ["content_id"]=> string(5) "11771" ["content_title"]=> string(66) "The Season Four Reboot: How Successful Are TV Series Reinventions?" ["content_excerpt"]=> string(131) "Baz Greenland discusses the high and lows of season fours - the point in which TV shows needs to reinvent themselves to survive... " ["content_live_date"]=> string(19) "2018-07-30 08:30:42" ["content_update_date"]=> string(19) "2018-07-29 18:14:40" ["content_definition"]=> string(7) "Feature" ["content_tags"]=> string(298) "a:12:{i:0;s:5:"Alias";i:1;s:5:"Angel";i:2;s:24:"buffy the vampire slayer";i:3;s:10:"doctor who";i:4;s:8:"Homeland";i:5;s:5:"House";i:6;s:4:"Lost";i:7;s:21:"Star Trek: Enterprise";i:8;s:18:"Star Trek: Voyager";i:9;s:27:"Star Trek: Deep Space Nine";i:10;s:12:"Supernatural";i:11;s:11:"The X Files";}" ["content_link"]=> string(106) "http://www.thedigitalfix.com/content/the-season-four-reboot-how-successful-are-tv-series-reinventions.html" ["content_definition_slug"]=> string(7) "feature" ["content_username_slug"]=> string(13) "baz-greenland" ["full_json_content"]=> string(20178) "{"datasource":"Wordpress","ID":5771,"post_author":"5","post_date":"2018-07-30 08:30:42","post_date_gmt":"2018-07-30 07:30:42","post_content":"The longer a TV show runs, the longer it has to find ways to keep audiences entertained. The more characters exist on screen, the more they need to evolve. But that's the catch; if a character is on screen for seven or more years, they need to develop in that time. If they're still the same person they were in season one, you'd argue that the show hadn't done enough to develop them. But change them beyond what made them so entertaining in the first place and you might find them a shadow of their former selves.\r\n\r\nThe same goes for the premise. A crime procedural, medical drama or sitcom might be able to maintain the same episodic flow year after year but anything with a more long-running narrative needs to evolve too. If nothing really changes, what is there to keep the audience hooked four or five years on? At the same time, if the premise is strong to start with, any change might result in audiences switching off.\r\n\r\nLonger running shows tends to have a point in which they do a soft reboot. Supernatural<\/strong> had to switch up the premise of the oncoming apocalypse once that was resolved at the end of season five. While it certainly still entertains in its current thirteenth season, it was never as good as seasons two to five. Fellow supernatural series Angel<\/strong> flipped the whole Angel Investigations premise on its head, rebooting the core cast into running evil law firm Wolfram and Hart in season five. Even The X Files<\/strong> did a quasi reboot, bringing in John Doggett to replace Fox Mulder in seasons eight and nine after David Duchovny drastically reduced his role in the show and moved on.\r\n\r\nBut the most common 'reboot' period in a long-running TV show tends to happen around season four. At that point, the core story has often been told. Characters have evolved over three seasons beyond their original roles. Change is required to keep the current audience interested and its often the point when the premise can be shaken up to attract new viewers.\r\n\r\n\"\"\r\n\r\nIt's been happening for years. Doctor Who <\/strong>did the biggest shake up of any TV show ever when it replaced leading man William Hartnell with Patrick Troughton in its fourth series, creating with it the enduring premise of regeneration. And it worked, proving that a TV series can survive the loss of its leading star<\/a>.\r\n\r\nBut in the last twenty years this has become more common. JJ Abrams did it with two of his most successful shows. The \"we have to go back\" cliff-hanger at the end of season three saw serial drama Lost <\/strong>flip the tired flashback premise that had dragged down its third season with flashforwards, the island based drama leading to the escape of the 'Oceanic Six' in season four. After complex family intrigues, new terrorist organisations and complex Rambaldi mythology, spy show\u00a0Alias<\/strong> 'rebooted to its basic premise with Sidney Bristow and co recruited under new black ops unit APO, headed up by former villain Arvin Sloan. The weekly adventures failed to capture the heights of the previous three seasons and perhaps that is why the episodic nature of season four was largely abandoned in its fifth and final season in an attempt to capture the magic of previous years.\r\n\r\n\"\"\r\n\r\nBuffy The Vampire Slayer<\/strong> had to revisit its premise after the characters graduated in style from Sunnydale High at the end of season three. The fourth season served as a mini-reboot of the premise, with Angel moving to his own spin-off series and the more adult university setting allowing for some more mature storytelling. While it still produced classics like Hush<\/em> and Restless<\/em> and made fan favourite Spike a series regular there was a notable shift in tone that came with the fourth season. Arguably the show - as great as it was in its remaining years - never quite recaptured the magic of those second and third seasons.\r\n\r\nFor Doctor<\/strong> Who<\/strong> and Lost<\/strong>, the series \/ season four reboot was a big success, giving both shows the adrenalin boost they needed to survive. Buffy The Vampire Slayer<\/strong> was perhaps more successful than Alias<\/strong> in its enduring quality and critical success. It's a fine balance between gaining new viewers and keeping the old happy, between doing something fresh and not doing something that detracts too far from what audiences' liked in the first place.\r\n\r\n\"\"\r\n\r\nHouse<\/strong> chucked out the core supporting cast into recurring roles as Gregory House trained up a new batch of interns that didn't quite reach the magic of the originals but was perhaps to afraid to fully move on either, with the old band hanging around almost to the very end. On the other side, Homeland<\/strong>\u00a0moved on from a principal character in Brody, his death at the end of season three turning the show into a quasi-CIA anthology series, with a new setting each year that reinvigorated the premise. It's just a shame that it took two years to get there; imagine how much more powerful the series would have been had Brody detonated the suicide bomb at the end of the first season?\r\n\r\nEven\u00a0Star Trek<\/strong> has tried to revive its core premise in its fourth seasons;\u00a0Star Trek: Deep Space Nine<\/strong> brought in TNG's Worf and a stronger Klingon premise.\u00a0Star Trek: Voyager<\/strong> added 'sexy Borg' crewmember Seven of Nine and\u00a0Star Trek: Enterprise<\/strong> finally started to tell multi-episode prequel stories worthy of its premise in the fourth and final year.\r\n\r\n\"\"\r\n\r\nStar Trek: Deep Space Nine <\/strong>rose to new heights, the Dominion arc introduced at the end of season two reinvigorated further by the Klingon presence that tore up the rule book of what Star Trek<\/strong> had established. The fourth run of episodes was perhaps the strongest Star Trek: Voyager <\/strong>ever did, though it floundered come seasons six and seven. And Star Trek: Enterprise<\/strong> was certainly strongest in year four. Sadly it was too little too late for the series and the franchise as a whole, ending a continuous TV presence that had lasted eighteen years.\r\n\r\nYear four is the year that many shows find themselves faced with the question of where to go next, where the opportunity to reinvent themselves is ripe with opportunity. These quasi-reboots are often the lifeline the shows' need to continue for many more years to come, assuming that change isn't too little, too late. They don't always herald a 'golden age' in the show's history, but they can shake things up enough to make it a success for many more years to come.