Ninja Pussy Cat Review

During the 16th Century, at the height of the Japanese Provincial War period, Samurai lords fought against one another in endless battles. Although the most prominent lord, Ieyasu, captured the throne of the Shogun and took over Japan, the country remained unstable. The two biggest ninja clans, Iga and Fuma, battled endlessly. Kotaro of the Fuma Clan was looking for a chance to destroy Hattori Hanzo, the head of the Iga Clan, and gain power over the Shogun.

Kotaro had heard a rumour about the Shogun’s family that if proven true, would send the country into chaos. What is the secret of the Shogun family…?


Who cares? It has ninja sex!


Ninja Pussy Cat - because the roughly translated ‘Female Ninja Who Attacks with Body Fluids’ doesn’t quite slip off the tongue - sees director Hiroyuki Kawasaki predating his Azumi knock-off Female Ninja Kasumi (reviewed here), with a far saucier tale of revenge. Setting events during well-documented times of political unrest, and placing some legendary figures at its forefront, Ninja Pussy Cat (unsurprisingly) isn’t particularly interested in providing much of a history lesson, but rather in establishing an alternate timeline with which to spark off a series of super-sexual showdowns. The plot then is rather thin, even by Pink Cinema standards, with characters entering and exiting in true ninja fashion and leaving little by way of exploration, while the amount of names fleetingly banded about does lead on to proceedings becoming unnecessarily convoluted at times. But it’s knowingly ridiculous through and through; when things get as silly as Hanzo Hattori - played far more vile and villainous as usually expected - plotting to take out a rival by using our lead heroine’s awesome pussy powers, you kinda need to stop scrutinizing.

After all it’s really about the body rockin’, and actor/director Kawasaki - a veteran of Lady Ninja movies - conjures up a bevy of wild and fantastical ninja arts to fill up our perhaps already depraved minds. In fact, he might just have committed to celluloid the best Kunoichi training sequence ever, so for that I tip my proverbial hat. Performances are mostly hammy but entirely fun and the camera work is lively and well-staged. The result is a film which neatly manages to keep interest afloat, despite being a tad formulaic.


The DVD

Pink Eiga’s region-free presentation of Ninja Pussy Cat is nothing to get overly excited about. The non-anamorphic transfer is in a pretty ropey state, exhibiting heavy ringing and aliasing, colour bleed (particularly on dark blue), minor compression artefacts and interlacing. It’s not much worse than the majority of their output to date, so those currently enjoying the catalogue know well what to expect. A fully watchable film, but in no way contender material.

Audio options consist of Japanese 2.0 and 5.1 Surround. Both tracks are unremarkable but decent. With regards to the 5.1 option, environmental effects aren’t too bad and the bass is lively enough, though separation is a weaker aspect, with some dialogue which should remain centred creeping through the rears. Additionally there is a distinct ambient hiss in the background, which probably comes from on-location sound recording, while both tracks show to be slightly out of sync with lip movements. The English subtitles are hard-matted to the image, but provide a solid and grammatically sound translation.

Extras

Exceeding the A/V quality of the disc, Pink Eiga once again provides exclusive new material with a set of welcome interviews. First up we’ve an introduction piece by Director Hiroyuki Kawasaki and Actress Yoko Satomi (4.35), both of whom appear in high spirits and acknowledge their long-standing friendship. They talk about acting together in a number of features as partners, bring up Satomi’s writing credits and reminisce briefly about working on the set of Ninja Pussy Cat.

Yoko Satomi is then called upon for a solo interview (12.54) in which she discusses starting out in Pink Cinema. She goes into her first meeting with Satoru Kobayashi (famed for making the first ever pink film) and subsequently forming a relationship that would continue to see her working with him up until his death. She also touches upon connecting with her audience through Pink Cinema, her first meeting with Hiroyuki Kawasaki as an actor, and what she feels are the attractive points of the films she makes.

Hiroyuki Kawasaki is up next (15.50), going through a similar series of questions as he talks us through his humble beginnings to his present situation, which has seen him direct over 21 movies for the V-Cinema market. As a man who predominantly makes Kunoichi films he naturally expresses what draws him to such productions, before getting onto the actual shooting details for Ninja Pussy Cat. Some of the more interesting aspects cover how he overcame restrictions on showing blood and how some “unorthodox” camera techniques were utilized on the feature. Then there’s a little on actors and how the director expresses himself through his films. Overall, two nice little pieces featuring two evidently lovely people.

Smaller stuff next with biographies for Director Hiroyuki Kawasaki, Producer Akira Fukamachi and actors Yoko Satomi and Takahiro Nomura. Finally a photo gallery, poster art and trailers round off the disc.


Overall

Beware the Honeypot Hell!

Film
6 out of 10
Video
5 out of 10
Audio
6 out of 10
Extras
6 out of 10
Overall

6

out of 10
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