Anchor and Hope Review

Following on from his 2014 long distance romance, 10,000KM, Carlos Marques-Marcet, once again, looks at love in the modern age. In Anchor and Hope, he reunites with Natalia Tena and David Verdaguer only this time they are both on the same continent.

Kat (Tena) and Eva (Oona Chaplin) are four years into their relationship and following the death of their cat Chorizo, the conversation (re)turns to children. Enter Kat’s best friend, Barcelona-based Roger (an impressively hirsute Verdaguer) who comes to stay on their houseboat. When Eva drunkenly expresses her desire and longing for a baby, Roger - the sport that he is - offers to supply his “little fish” and help create their family. The only one not completely on board with such a huge life decision is Kat, who still believes it is “narcissistic” and “selfish” to procreate.



Marques-Marcet and co-writer Jules Nurrish cite María Llopis' text Maternidades Subversivas in the film's credits, and it's easy to see how Llopsis' work inspired. She wrote of the different maternity models born in light of new experiences and struggles in today's society. No longer is motherhood limited to the hetero-normative cis-woman but can be subverted as a way of changing the world and even deemed an act of insurgency.

For so long, families had one model and this was only recreated onscreen. Thankfully, films have begun to catch up somewhat. There is a great scene in Anchor and Hope where the trio tell Eva's "wacky" mother Germaine (played by actual mater Geraldine Chaplin) about their baby plans and awakens an impassioned speech from Kat who speaks out against the older generation. Those who claimed to have "rebelled" and, as it turns out, did not change a thing, instead conforming where they failed. Choosing to have a child does not require the prerequisite checklist which some deem so important.

The film is shot episodically and made up of four titled vignettes. It's a screwball comedy for the 21st Century, containing a hilarious singalong to Inner Circle's 90s hit Sweat (A La La La La Long) and filmed on a houseboat which resides largely on London's canal system. It's a refreshing London which is depicted, almost idyllic with its palette of greens, oranges and golds, the grey and oppressive concrete jungle appears to be far away from this utopia. Dagmar Weaver-Madsen's camera moves languidly through the womb-like canal tunnels and serves the narrative and plot which remains largely unpredictable. All is topped off deliciously with an eclectic and whimsical soundtrack including tracks sung by both female leads.



All three actors work incredibly well together and the chemistry between Tena and Verdaguer - who can be seen in the delightful Summer 1993 - is, well tenable. The naturalism feels unforced and realistic, like a family playing for the camera (all to impress their older sibling behind it). While the two provide, at times, the humour, it is Oona Chaplin who provides the heart. She is wonderful as Eva who possesses a real vulnerability and tenacity (and aversion to tequila) which is hard to pull off convincingly.

Anchor and Hope is a decidedly honest, and modern love story which is unafraid to ask the big questions surrounding men, women and parenthood. All the while navigating the choppy waters faced in love and relationships.

Overall

Is it possible to live love, family, and life in such different ways and yet remain united? Anchor and Hope says si.

7

out of 10

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