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The Paul Newman Collection in November - Artwork added

Warner Home Video have announced the Region 1 DVD release of The Paul Newman Collection for 14th November 2006. Warner will celebrate one of Hollywood’s living legends with the debut of this collection offering seven of the actor’s films never before available on DVD. Harper, The Drowning Pool, The Left-Handed Gun, Mackintosh Man, Pocket Money, Somebody Up There Likes Me and The Young Philadelphians comprise the 7-disc giftset, enhanced with new and archival featurettes, and available for $59.92 SRP. Harper will also be sold as a single title for $19.97 SRP.

Harper (1966)
Paul Newman gives a memorable performance in this box-office hit based on Ross MacDonald’s The Moving Target. The first detective film in Newman’s then 23-film career, Newman’s sleuth, Lew Harper, chews gum fast and slips out of jams even faster while unraveling a twisted case of kidnapping and murder. William Goldman’s clever script is filled with quips and a parade of Los Angeles characters: a woman of means (Lauren Bacall), a gun-toting attorney (Arthur Hill), a poolside gigolo (Robert Wagner), a boozy ex-starlet (Shelley Winters), a jazz junkie (Julie Harris), Harper’s estranged wife (Janet Leigh) and the unholy order of the Temple of the Clouds (led by Strother Martin). Each possesses a clue. Or a bullet for Harper.

DVD Special Features:

  • Commentary by screenwriter William Goldman
  • Introduction by TCM host Robert Osborne
  • Theatrical trailer
  • Languages: English & French
  • Subtitles: English, French & Spanish (feature film only)

Drowning Pool (1975)
Newman returns as the quick-witted detective he first played nine years before in Harper. A cast to reckon with joins him in this mystery adapted from Ross MacDonald’s novel and directed by Stuart Rosenberg (Cool Hand Luke). Joanne Woodward plays the New Orleans oil heiress who turns to Harper for help with a seemingly routine blackmail case. Young Melanie Griffith is her kittenish daughter, and Tony Franciosa, Coral Browne, Andy Robinson and Murray Hamilton keep The Drowning Pool’s intrigue as thick as gumbo.

DVD Special Features:
  • Vintage featurette Harper Days Are Here Again
  • Theatrical trailer
  • Languages: English & French
  • Subtitles: English, French & Spanish (feature film only)

The Left Handed Gun (1958)
Newman plays William Bonney, the fabled and legendary gunslinger known as Billy the Kid. The West had never seen the likes of this Brooklyn-born desperado, a troubled teen who wrote his name in blood on history’s pages. And the genre had never before seen a performance like that of Paul Newman. He displays a complex, twitchy moodiness that captures the killer’s half-boy, half-man nature.

Another major presence is first-time film director Arthur Penn (Bonnie and Clyde, Little Big Man), here first exploring a theme he would return to again and again: the alienated outsider confronted by a hostile society. What Newman and Penn put on screen was new, provocative and startling, so it’s no surprise the movie’s initial reception was mixed. Today it’s hailed as a unique and influential Western.

DVD Special Features:
  • Commentary by director Arthur Penn
  • Theatrical trailer
  • Languages: English & French
  • Subtitles: English, French & Spanish (feature film only)

The Mackintosh Man (1973)
Paul Newman plays Joseph Rearden, British Intelligence’s man on the inside, in this tense and tricky thriller, directed by the legendary John Huston from a screenplay by Walter Hill (48 HRS.). It’s superbly cast with sterling talent that includes Dominique Sanda, Harry Andrews and Ian Bannen. James Mason (Newman’s adversary in The Verdict) plays a Member of Parliament who’s really a master spy – and the focus of Rearden’s assignment. In an era when spies came in from the cold, The Mackintosh Man generates a lot of heat.

DVD Special Features:
  • Vintage featurette John Huston: The Man, The Myth, The Moviemaker
  • Theatrical trailer
  • Languages: English & French
  • Subtitles: English, French & Spanish (feature film only)

Pocket Money (1972)
Newman and Lee Marvin star in this sunny comedy also featuring two veterans of Newman’s Cool Hand Luke: director Stuart Rosenberg and co-star Strother Martin. Newman plays debt-ridden cowboy Jim Kane and Marvin is his shifty pal Leonard, a big talker full of ideas that never pan out. As laid down in the deft screenplay by Terrence Malick (Badlands, The New World), they’re as likable a duo of drifters as ever rolled down the pike.

DVD Special Features:
  • Theatrical trailer
  • Subtitles: English, French & Spanish (feature film only)

Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956)
This inspiring bio-pic recounts the story of Rocky Graziano, the scrappy kid from New York who rose from poverty and rage to become middleweight champion. Newman plays Graziano to perfection, primarily because he met frequently with the real champ to study his speech and mannerisms. Robert Wise, who earlier captured the fight game in The Set-Up, directs what would become Newman’s breakout film and win two Academy Awards -- Best B & W Cinematography and Best Black and White Art Direction. Steve McQueen and Robert Loggia make their screen debuts; Perry Como sings the title song.

DVD Special Features:
  • Commentary by Paul Newman, Robert Loggia, Director Robert Wise, Martin Scorsese and Richard Schickel
  • Theatrical trailer
  • Languages: English & French
  • Subtitles: English, French & Spanish (feature film only)

The Young Philadelphians (1959)
Newman plays young lawyer-on-the-rise Anthony Lawrence in this grand, glossy melodrama layered with the power and privilege of Philadelphia’s social elite. The supporting cast is upper-crust in talent as well as Hollywood history: Barbara Rush, Brian Keith, Alexis Smith, Billie Burke, John Williams and others. Robert Vaughn was nominated for a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his role as the blue-blooded outcast Lawrence risks his career to defend in a sensational murder trial. The film received two other nominations (Best Cinematography, Best Costume Design). Vincent Sherman directed.

DVD Special Features:
  • Commentary by director Vincent Sherman and film historian Drew Casper, author of Postwar Hollywood 1946-1962
  • Theatrical trailer
  • Subtitles: English, French & Spanish (feature film only)



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