Dirty Harry Collection Review

In 1971, a movie named Dirty Harry exploded onto the scene and gave audiences one of the most memorable and formidable characters to ever grace cinema in Harry Callaghan, armed with his trusted .44 Magnum. Clint Eastwood is Dirty Harry. Eastwood doesn't just play Harry, he is Harry, or more precisely his portrayal of Harry has often superseded the persona of Eastwood's real-life celebrity self in audience's minds. Although Eastwood wasn't the first choice, his casting makes perfect sense, as if it is some sort of extension of his Man With No Name character in the brilliant Leone Western trilogy.




The film spawned four sequels, and became such a permanent part of contemporary culture that it is easy to merge the five films into one, and to tarnish the series with the same brush as other inferior actioners that lack a moral core. Like the Planet Of The Apes legacy, Dirty Harry had sequels that were certainly very good but ultimately cheapened the original. Watching Dirty Harry today, one is almost surprised to note that behind the violent aesthetics is one of the most intelligent police thrillers ever to have been made. Over the course of the five films, a wide variety of interesting topics are covered, which were very reflective of the times the films were made. Dirty Harry deals with the issues of having to break laws and violate rights in order to stop a proven killer killing. Magnum Force turns the first film's notion on its head, dealing with the prevention of vigilante cops who have excessively taken the law into their own hands. The Enforcer deals with the rising issue of equality in the police force (whilst also attempting to slightly cash in on the then Blaxpoitation craze). The early eighties retreat to American republicanism brought Harry back in fashion, and Sudden Impact and it's famous 'Make My Day' line sat on the same bus as many of Reagan's policies, and also gave cinema a memorable screen villainess. The Dead Pool, arguably the most inferior of the sequels, was a straightforward routine Harry movie but at least it paired Callahan with an Oriental partner and acted as a stinging critique on media's glorification of the celebrity. As a whole, the Dirty Harry Collection is a must-have for anyone fascinated with Eastwood's legendary character. Violent, determined, ruthless and yet charismatic in a minimalist way, Harry Callahan lives on, even if his last film was made more than twelve years ago.




Dirty Harry (1971)

A young, sick psycho named Scorpio (Andy Robinson) is killing off random citizens in the city of San Francisco, and is mailing ransom letters to the mayor. 'Dirty' Harry Callahan (Clint Eastwood) is brought in to find Scorpio, despite his reputation for police brutality and his deliberate ignorance of political red tape. However, the mayor has nowhere else to turn, as Scorpio is always on the search for new victims.




Dirty Harry is not fundamentally a police thriller but is more accurately a character study of a man caught up in the system he despises. Be it foiling bank robbers, talking people out of suicide or acting as bagman for murderers, Harry does not discriminate between one criminal and another. Harry is one hundred percent hero, or anti-hero, in that he exists in his own world of ethics in between the state of criminals and the state of political monsters who are in the system for their own agenda. Harry's pure cop, as if his job is solely to rid society of criminals, and yet because of his purity he also has to continually fight his own system because of his extreme yet effective methods. If Harry doesn't exist, the war boundary between law and crime is easily detectable. Because Harry exists, the system of law and order appears riddled with contradiction and bureaucracy, when its sole function should be supporting any method Harry uses to prevent criminals carrying out their evil. Essentially, Dirty Harry suggests that society calls on people like Callahan to operate outside the law because of the inadequacy of the police in fulfilling their crime prevention responsibilities.

Several factors contribute to make Dirty Harry a classic. The directing by Don Siegel (one of five collaborations with Eastwood) gives the film an almost mystical status similar to something like Taxi Driver, in that it worships its main protagonist despite his wrong-doings. Each frame is beautifully composed, rendering urban San Francisco as some sort of hippie-hellhole struggling to maintain law and order. Callahan, frequently donned in sunglasses, is almost presented as some sort of ruthless killing machine, with the audience unable to enter his soul unless he lets them. Indeed, Harry is almost completely alienated from society, and Siegel's direction reinforces this heavily. Notice the fantastic early morning shot in which Harry looms over the stunning Golden Gate bridge overlooking the city, as if he is some dark angel acting behind-the-scenes to keep the wheel turning. Siegel also throws in some fantastic black humour for the film, such as the magnificent "I know what you are thinking - Did I fire six shots or only five - Do I Feel Lucky" sequence, which suggests Harry's role as some teasing tormentor of unlucky criminals who happen to cross him. Other tremendous scenes involved Harry running between phone booth to phone booth to meet Scorpio's demands, or the fiery showdown in Keysar Stadium to the school bus conclusion, that is almost primal in its ultimately-good versus ultimately-evil battle. The atmospheric rumbling score by Lalo Schifrin creates such a frenetically tense tone to the film that it is kind of like an aggressive theme for Harry's determination. The bright cinematography by Bruce Surtees uses excessive primary colourings to enhance its imagery, in that it doesn't shy away from any visual or symbolic horror. We the audience are treated to blood in bright sunshine, almost as if crime has even breached daily routine. The most impressive aspect is Eastwood himself as Callahan, as he manages to convey the inner bitterness of his character through his stares and his frowns. He doesn't need words, he doesn't need laws, he just needs actions, and Clint Eastwood is perfect.




A modern day western transplanted to urban society, Dirty Harry has been criticised for being too reactionary to the system and for depicting a protagonist who is ultimately too dictatorial to operate within the law. The film doesn't apologise for these traits, it embraces them and thus turns the spotlight back on society itself, as Harry Callahan is forced to operate outside of society's laws by society itself. Granted, the film pushes every manipulation button it can in making you want to hate Scorpio, even having the murderer kidnap a bus full of school children. Ironically, the same year that Dirty Harry was made, The French Connection's poster artwork featured a man being shot in the back by Popeye Doyle (Gene Hackman), the most memorable and yet most fascist sequence in the film. These two films encapsulate the public's desire for effective police protection and their disregard for law and order as long as their safety is guaranteed. This is why Dirty Harry is a masterpiece of seventies cinema, as any film that is completely devoid of political correctness and can successfully garner the full support of the audience in its promotion of operating above the law is surely an important piece of work.




Picture
Presented in anamorphic 2.35:1 widescreen, the transfer is very good, and appears to better the previous bare-bones release. Although grainy and washed out in the night scenes, Dirty Harry is a film that simply must be seen in widescreen, and the DVD complements the film highly. Like all films in the series, a few digital artefacts crop up occasionally, but this doesn't ever prove to be detrimental.

Sound
Presented in an excellent 5.1 remix, Dirty Harry packs a heavier audible punch, and sounds are even clearer and more gritty in their origin. Lalo Schifrin's score and the film's main action sequences benefits the most from the remix, as they're spread over left and right channels effectively and is given more room to breathe. The dialogue is mostly mono, with a few sound effects positioned in the surround channels. The only minor flaw is the omission of the film's original theatrical sound mix.




Menu: A static menu comprising some stills from the film, backed with good portions of Lalo Schifrin's main theme.

Packaging: The usual Warner snapper with Clint Eastwood Collection border. Virtually identical to the original bare-bones release over than the words "SPECIAL EDITION" appearing at the bottom, which suggests customers could easily become confused between the different versions.

Extras

Dirty Harry: The Original: A good thirty minute retrospective documentary featuring interviews from Eastwood and various other members of cast and crew, intercut with some of the finer moments of the five-film series. The presenter Robert Urich is slightly wooden and annoying, but this is an interesting documentary that manages to sum up the series well. Eastwood admits to originally preferring Seattle as a location for the film, and portrayer of Scorpio, Andy Robinson, recalls how deeply distressed he was to play such a horrible person. Presented in fullscreen 4:3.

Interview Gallery: More detailed interviews with the stars and crew of the series, oddly not incorporated into the documentary and lasting approximately twenty-five minutes. These interviews are as interesting as the documentary itself, and feature more intimate revelations about the contributors' experiences of making the films. Such as John Milius remembering asking for a Magnum .44 when making the sequel and talking about how he admires Clint Eastwood or Andy Robinson claiming he suggested doing a body-flip when Scorpio is shot in the leg in Keysar Stadium.

Original Documentary: This is a seven minute 1971 featurette featuring promotional clips of Dirty Harry and interestingly chronicling the progress of the classic western to Dirty Harry. As a thirty-minute featurette, this approach would have been fascinating, but at seven minutes it barely skims the surface. Presented in fullscreen 4:3.

Original Trailer: A three minute remastered trailer presented in anamorphic 2.35:1 widescreen that is essentially a brief mix of the best plot-driven scenes and images and is tamer than it could have been.

Cast & Crew: A brief text page detailing the major players of the cast and crew without any further information.

Conclusion
A violent masterpiece of cinema, fuelled with immortal icon-making characters and sequences, is given an acceptable if slightly underwhelming special edition re-release. If you are buying this as part of the five-film collection, than you needn't worry as much. If however, you are purchasing this as an upgrade to the bare-bones release then you perhaps should consider it more carefully, as the extras do not warrant a repurchase, as they aren't extensive enough.

Director: Don Siegel

Starring: Clint Eastwood, Harry Guardino, Reni Santoni, John Vernon, Andrew Robinson, John Larch, John Mitchum, Mae Mercer, Lyn Edgington, Ruth Kobart, Woodrow Parfrey, Josef Sommer, William Paterson

Running Time: 99 Minutes

FILM: 10/10
VIDEO: 8/10
AUDIO: 8/10
EXTRAS: 5/10
OVERALL: 7/10





Magnum Force (1973)

In response to the criticisms of Dirty Harry, emerging screenwriters John Milius and Michael Cimino (who would later make the epic Deer Hunter) concocted a film that single-handedly destroyed all preconceptions the public might have had. The plot for Magnum Force deliberately took the heat off of Dirty Harry, and essentially rendered the nature of Callahan's soul even harder to penetrate.




Magnum Force has an interesting story dilemma. Underworld crime figures that have luckily escaped prosecution are being murdered across San Francisco one by one, and Harry Callahan is called in to investigate, despite the reluctance of Lt. Briggs (Hal Holbrook), who doesn't want to go near the case. It appears that someone is giving the criminals the justice they deserve; justice they assume Harry Callahan will whole-heartily approve of. However, just like the criminals who cross his path, Harry has been underestimated.

Magnum Force makes the character of Harry Callahan more enigmatic than ever. If governed by the principles demonstrated in Dirty Harry, Callahan would clearly have encouraged the schemes of the vigilantes. However, anyone who champions this claim fails to understand the moral core of Callahan himself. Harry wants a society governed by law, but a set law that will protect innocent citizens from the criminal 'scum' who pollute their society. From Callahan's perspective, the problem with the vigilantes in Magnum Force is that rather than work to set up a suitable society maintained with respectable law and order, they are almost hellbent on causing a revolution. As Harry says himself "Next thing you'll be shooting someone for jaywalking".

Compared to the sunny San Francisco of Dirty Harry, Magnum Force maintains the brightness to some extents but replaces the film's structure with a darker outlook. It's almost as if the film is some sort of modern-apocalyptic tale on the destruction of peaceful society. This is particularly evident in the film's gripping conclusion, where the shade-wearing vigilantes are almost robot-like in their dogged persistence. The film is an exceptionally powerful message to both the critics of the first film and society in general, and director Ted Post's visual worship of Callahan almost portrays him as Death himself. Also, Post presents San Francisco as more of a dense moribund, wasting away as a fiery hellhole. Post does a sterling job on Magnum Force, deciding wisely to not follow in Don Siegel's footsteps and imitate Dirty Harry, and instead destroys the first's emotional attachment. Magnum Force isn't a film in which the audience follows the protagonist; it's more of a war between the good and the would-be-good, with the audience given ringside seats.




Clint Eastwood is arguably better in Magnum Force than he is in Dirty Harry. Eastwood perfectly carries the extra sense of Harry's alienation, in so much as Harry always looks like he has no-one to turn to but himself, and so has to rely upon his own wits. Hal Holbrook has an excellent role as Lt. Briggs, a bitter police chief who seems incapable of controlling Callahan.

Incidentally, one might detect the fact that Michael Cimino is obviously obsessed with the concept of 'Russian Roulette', since both Magnum Force and The Deer Hunter contain references to the dreadful lottery-meets-shooting game. Even so, Cimino and John Milius have given the film an interesting concept that helped further push the character of Harry Callahan into the mainstream's foremost thoughts.


Picture
Presented in anamorphic 2.35:1 widescreen, the transfer is very good although excessively grainy in places. Some of the night time sequences are extremely dark and almost hard to follow, but on the whole the transfer is very good.

Sound
Presented in a 5.1 remix, Magnum Force contains argubaly the best mix of all the series, with good, thumping Lalo Schifrin score which embodies most of the Dirty Harry motifs, and is given good stereo spatial separation. The effects are also panned nicely across the channels, and give added dimension to the film's action level.




Menu: A static menu comprising some stills from the film, backed with portions of Lalo Schifrin's score.

Packaging: The usual Warner snapper with Clint Eastwood Collection border, and the same as Dirty Harry other than relevant poster and title details.

Extras

The Hero Cop: Yesterday And Today: An eight minute 1973 featurette containing a few behind the scenes clips and some brief interviews, combined with some historical context on the heroics of past police officers. Presented in fullscreen 4:3.

Original Trailer: A powerful trailer that packs an exciting wallop, and most have done much for generating a good box office for the film.

Cast & Crew: A brief text page detailing the major players of the cast and crew without any further information.

Conclusion
Although the extras are minimal, Magnum Force is an exceptional film worthy of a stand-alone purchase, especially as the picture and sound qualities are very good.

Director: Ted Post

Starring: Clint Eastwood, Hal Holbrook, Mitchell Ryan, David Soul, Felton Perry, Robert Urich, Tim Matheson, Kip Niven, Albert Popwell

Running Time: 118 Minutes

FILM: 9/10
VIDEO: 8/10
AUDIO: 8/10
EXTRAS: 4/10
OVERALL: 7/10





The Enforcer (1976)

After Dirty Harry and Magnum Force purposefully stood by opposing viewpoints both morally and stylistically, any subsequent sequel would have to choose which path to follow. The Enforcer, along with the two later sequels, chose to follow the thematic issues more akin to Dirty Harry, and is more of a follow-on sequel than Magnum Force in terms of the overall series of films.




Although the plot concerns with hippie-terrorist groups threatening to blow things up for their cause, and black organisations struggling to keep a distance, The Enforcer is essentially concerned with pairing Callahan with a female partner; in a sense testing the feminists who push for equality in all organisations. Of course, Callahan is reluctant to have any partner, let alone a female one, and the film is more of an experiment, albeit a biased one.

After Callahan produces his messy yet successful approach to a hostage raid, they city decides enough is enough and he is relegated to Personnel, to help interview patrol officers for a promotion to inspector. In an effort to “winnow out the Neanderthals from the police department,” Callahan is told that out of the eight positions available, three will be filled by women. This angers him, as he fails to see why women should automatically be guaranteed three places solely due to their gender. Even so, Callahan is eventually partnered with Insp. Moore (Cagney & Lacey's Tyne Daly), a by-the-book officer who has never made an arrest in her life. However, hippie terrorists rob an arms warehouse and embark on a cold-hearted and murderous spree across San Francisco in an effort to further their cause (which is never really explained). Soon Callahan and Moore are assigned to a case, and Harry has to learn to work with his inexperienced female partner.

The Enforcer is nowhere as downbeat or as gritty as the two previous Harry films, but still has enough likeable charm of its own. The villains are nothing more than two-dimensional stereotypes (as they would be to Callahan) and are treated as such, with the focus rightly centred on the working relationship between Callahan and Moore. What's interesting about the film, is that although it appears to promote the liberal equality issue raised in the film, the conclusion and the resulting fates of Callahan and Moore suggests what stance the film ultimately takes on the issue.

As Moore, Tyne Daly is excellent support for Clint Eastwood. She's tough and yet almost domesticated in appearance, and provides good evidence as to why she was cast in the early eighties female cop series Cagney & Lacy. Eastwood himself shows a more 'off-hours' persona, and is less intense (for better or for worse). The directing by James Fargo is average; he doesn't overdo the use of San Francisco vistas and he lets the actors go with their instincts. The only main problem with Fargo's approach to The Enforcer is that he hasn't rendered the film important enough. It's as if the film deliberately aims for a lower level than Dirty Harry and Magnum Force. As a switch from Lalo Schifrin, frequent Eastwood collaborator Jerry Fielding was brought in to compose the film's score, and he does a commendable job of giving the film that mid-seventies funk overtone.




As sequels go, The Enforcer is a very diverting film with lots to enjoy from watching it. As long as you don't expect another classic police thriller, there's no reason why you won't like it. It has a once-dated-but-now-back-in-fashion seventies look to it, and has much of Dirty Harry's trademark humour, packed with a hellish amount of violence.

Picture
Presented in anamorphic 2.35:1 widescreen, the transfer is good yet contains a few digital artefacts that are noticeable in some panning shots. Even so, the transfer is very clean and visually striking.

Sound
Presented in a 5.1 remix, The Enforcer contains less of a memorable mix compared to Dirty Harry or Magnum Force, with music being separated to two channels, and the occasional sound effects using full spatial channellings.




Menu: A static menu comprising some stills from the film, backed with portions of Jerry Fielding's score.

Packaging: The usual Warner snapper with Clint Eastwood Collection border, and the same as Dirty Harry other than relevant poster and title details.

Extras

Harry Callahan/Clint Eastwood: Something Special In Films: A six minute 1976 featurette containing a few behind the scenes clips and some brief interviews. Like all contemporary featurettes, this is interesting to watch to compare the styles with the featurettes of today. Presented in fullscreen 4:3.

Original Trailer: A two minute trailer that announces that "Harry Is Back" and that he is the dirtiest enforcer around!

Cast & Crew: A brief text page detailing the major players of the cast and crew without any further information.

Conclusion
As part of the box set collection, The Enforcer is a worthy member, but as a stand-alone purchase, fans might have to think twice, as extras are minimal.

Director: James Fargo

Starring: Clint Eastwood, Tyne Daly, Harry Guardino, Bradford Dillman, John Mitchum, DeVeren Bookwalter, John Crawford, Samantha Doane, Robert F. Hoy, Jocelyn Jones, M.G. Kelly, Nick Pellegrino, Albert Popwell


Running Time: 93 Minutes

FILM: 7/10
VIDEO: 7/10
AUDIO: 5/10
EXTRAS: 3/10
OVERALL: 5/10





Sudden Impact (1983)

After a survey was commissioned to test whether audiences were ready for Sean Connery to return as James Bond, audiences responded more excitedly to claims that Clint Eastwood would return as Harry Callahan. Thus, a third sequel was commissioned, and screenwriter Joseph Stinson adapted a different project by Earl Smith and Charles Pierce into a Dirty Harry vehicle named Sudden Impact. This time, Eastwood himself, now a renowned director of such classics as Play Misty For Me and The Outlaw Josey Wales would direct.




The plot tells of Harry again being underfire due to his unorthodox police methods. His bosses have become annoyed at his frequent controversy and have suggested (ordered) Callahan to take a vacation. However, Harry's 'holiday' continues to attract trouble, so in order to take the heat off his back, he is sent to the small town of San Paulo, in order to investigate a homicide. A dead body has been discovered by the bay, with two gunshot wounds, one in the head, and one in the groin. At first, Harry treats the homicide as routine, until he realises that a group of similar murders are cropping up over the town.

Sudden Impact is a good, formulaic example of a Harry movie, but features less charm and less intelligence than its predecessors. Yes, it tries to turn proceedings full circle by providing a female villain, but Sudden Impact cannot escape the feeling of looking tired, as if the series has run out of steam. The film contains the memorable line from Callahan, the "Go ahead, make my day" warning, which echoed the ensuing political debate on laws regarding being able to use excessive force on an intruder. The policy was heavily in line with Republican Ronald Reagan, who used it in an address to Congress when challenged on an issue. The line of dialogue even inspired a law to be named after it. The 'Make My Day' law required that "the entry be unlawful and the occupant have a reasonable belief that the intruder has committed or intends to commit a crime in the dwelling. If that is the case, the occupant of the dwelling is justified in using any degree of physical force including deadly physical force against the other person." As the series of film often reflect society's own viewpoint with regards to law and order, Sudden Impact has Harry actually become sympathetic to a female murderer, almost mirroring society's growing awareness that abused women in times of crisis have to resort to striking back at their victimisers. In this case, the woman (Sandra Locke who was often romantically involved with Clint Eastwood) is essentially 'terminating' the list of men who gang-raped her and her sister many years earlier.




Eastwood does an acceptable job as director, utilising some beautiful Carmel landscapes and using a different technique of flashbacks in a Harry movie for a change. The action is still violent, and the character of Harry Callahan is just an older version of his Dirty Harry self. On the whole, it's a film that will please fans of the series, and will provide moderate entertainment to anyone wishing to kill two hours, even if it's just showing off Harry's new gun.

Picture
Presented in anamorphic 2.35:1 widescreen, the transfer is quite good although it does contain a few brief shimmers and elements of dirt. Colours are slightly dated in saturation and the print has a washed out quality. Also, some obvious print scratches can be detected in places.

Sound
Presented in a 5.1 remix, Sudden Impact's mix is essentially stereo with left/right channelling of the musical score and a few sound effects. The music score by Lalo Schifrin sounds dated and tacky, proving that the gifted composer had lost his way by the nineteen eighties.




Menu: A static menu comprising some stills from the film, backed with portions of Lalo Schifrin's score.

Packaging: The usual Warner snapper with Clint Eastwood Collection border, and the same as Dirty Harry other than relevant poster and title details.

Extras

Original Trailer: Probably the best of the Harry trailers, short, concise and packed full of the film's better moment.

Cast & Crew: A brief text page detailing the major players of the cast and crew without any further information.

Conclusion
As Sudden Impact was directed by Eastwood himself, many of the actor/director fans might want to pick this up as stand-alone, even if it doesn't warrant a purchase, due to it essentially being a moderate film on a bare-bones disc.

Director: Clint Eastwood

Starring: Clint Eastwood, Sondra Locke, Pat Hingle, Bradford Dillman, Paul Drake, Audrie J. Neenan, Jack Thibeau, Michael Currie, Albert Popwell, Mark Keyloun, Kevyn Major Howard, Bette Ford, Nancy Parsons

Running Time: 113 Minutes

FILM: 6/10
VIDEO: 7/10
AUDIO: 6/10
EXTRAS: 1/10
OVERALL: 4/10





The Dead Pool (1988)

Planet Of The Apes should have stopped at Conquest Of The Planet Of The Apes, Lethal Weapon should have stopped at III and Police Academy should have stopped at...Police Academy. Just like these series of films, Dirty Harry is given an unnecessary sequel in which the cast and crew are defrosted for one more outing.

Having said that, The Dead Pool is very watchable in its own limited way. It never transpires to match the quality of Dirty Harry or Magnum Force, but instead aims to be a good ninety minute action thriller, coupled with the screen presence of Harry Callahan.




The clichéd plot deals with horror film director Peter Swan (Liam Neeson), who is involved in a game with his crew-members known as "The Dead Pool". In this game the players each choose a list of ten celebrities who they think will die that year. The winner is the one whose list has the most number of dead celebrities. Harry is called in to investigate when it is realised that the names on Swan's list start to die off in mysterious circumstances, and is worried when he finds his name on the list.

The Dead Pool feels more like an adequate television spin-off as opposed to a full length feature film. It weighs in at eighty eight minutes, and the directing by frequent Eastwood collaborator Buddy Van Horn (Pink Cadillac, Any Which Way You Can) seems tacky at best. The heavy point of the media's obsession with the notion of celebrity is overplayed, and the romance angle for Callahan seems far removed from the fiery protagonist of the earlier films. Evan C. Kim is fine as Harry's Asian-American partner Al Quan, and you might notice Jim Carrey as wacko performer Johnny Squires. There is a thrilling and humourous homage to Bullitt, in which Callahan is pursued by an explosive-filled radio controlled car across the streets of San Francisco, but that action sequence is the best the film delivers.

The Dead Pool isn't a worthy finish for the legacy of Harry Callahan movies, but it still provides a medium amount of entertainment. It looks very dated and inferior compared to the cop thrillers of today, and even compared to the earlier Harry movies. Watching this movie, you won't be surprised to learn that the film was completed quickly to fulfill a contract obligation for Warner Brothers!

Picture
In a change to the series, The Dead Pool is presented in anamorphic 1.78:1 widescreen as opposed to 2.35:1. The transfer is very good, due mostly to the fact that the film is the most recent of the series. A few elements of dirt appears on occasions, but the transfer is the sharpest to grace a Dirty Harry film.

Sound
Again, because this is the newest of the films, the sound mix is very sharp and full of spatial channellings. This is particularly noticeable in the action sequences, such as the bullet fights in chapter 14 or the frantic car chase. Presented in 5.1 Dolby.




Menu: A static menu comprising some stills from the film, backed with portions of Lalo Schifrin's score.

Packaging: The usual Warner snapper with Clint Eastwood Collection border, and the same as Dirty Harry other than relevant poster and title details.

Extras

Original Trailer: A dated eighties trailer with a rock-orientated soundtrack filling the numerous actions sequences that are littered over the trailer.

Cast & Crew: A brief text page detailing the major players of the cast and crew without any further information.

Conclusion
The fifth and final Harry film is given a disk that is good in terms of picture and sound but poor in terms of extras. This is strictly for those who own the box set anyhow, as the film doesn't have enough to command a stand-alone purchase.

Director: Buddy Van Horn

Starring: Clint Eastwood, Patricia Clarkson, Liam Neeson, Evan C. Kim, David Hunt, Michael Currie, Michael Goodwin, Darwin Gillett, Anthony Charnota, Jim Carrey


Running Time: 88 Minutes

FILM: 5/10
VIDEO: 8/10
AUDIO: 7/10
EXTRAS: 1/10
OVERALL: 5/10





OVERALL CONCLUSION
At quite a cheap price, the Dirty Harry Collection is a must for fans, as it culls all of the films together and provides as many extras as Warner Brothers has in their vaults. The extras are still sparse and lacking in most places, but the picture and sound qualities are greatly improved for the films, which are themselves tremendous moral and violent entertainment.

Film
8 out of 10
Video
8 out of 10
Audio
7 out of 10
Extras
4 out of 10
Overall

7

out of 10

Last updated: 13/08/2018 14:14:59

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