Twin Peaks Revisited: 1.04

TV revivals are a big thing. In 2016, The X Files returned to our screens after a 14-year absence and here at The Digital Fix, we revisited key episodes across its ten seasons and two movies. But there is one revival that is surely bigger than that; Twin Peaks will be returning for an unprecedented third season, directed by David Lynch and set twenty-five years after season two’s shocking ending. It is a revival that has everyone excited and anxious in equal measure. With a phenomenal cast, including nearly every original actor there is hope that Twin Peaks’ new season can recapture the magic of the first year and a half. So, like The X Files, we’ve decided to revisit each episode in the build up to the show’s return. We’ll treat each revisit fresh and try to keep major conjecture to future episodes separate. So whether you’re seeking to revisit an old classic or ready to find out what all the fuss is about, let’s return to the world of Twin Peaks

Episode Summary

Laura Palmer is buried while her cousin Maddy visits Twin Peaks, prime suspect Leo is questioned, Albert Rosenfield and the results of Laura's autopsy reveal disturbing secrets...

Overview

The fourth episode of Twin Peaks is probably the slowest yet and a little bit of an anti-climax after the weird, revelatory dream and Agent Cooper’s claim that he knew who killed Laura Palmer at the end of the last episode. His recount of the dream to Truman and Lucy is very funny and fortunately this is where the episode is successful – that balance of anguished drama and comedy.

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Again, it is another episode laying the groundwork for the future. Cooper and Sheriff Truman question Leo about his involvement with Laura and the pieces of his involvement start to come together as the audience learns of connection to the referred but not seen Jacques Renault (Walter Olkewicz) – smuggling drugs across the border from Canada. With One Eyed Jacks making its debut last episode, Laura Palmer’s cocaine habit, and Mike and Bobby (not THAT Mike and Bobby from the dream) working for Leo, the darker side of Twin Peaks is really starting to intrigue. And that’s where the Bookhouse Boys come in, as Cooper is introduced to the secret society consisting of Truman, Deputy Hawk, Big Ed Hurley and his nephew James. Apparently there is an evil in those woods – another suggestion that there is something far more supernatural at play than just drugs.

Miguel Ferrer certainly made an impact last episode as Cooper’s colleague Albert Rosenfield and here he really lets loose in an unfortunate ‘disagreement’ at the morgue. Coming blow to blows with Benjamin Horne, Doctor Haywood and then Truman, Rosenfield drips sarcasm as he rants to Cooper what a backward people he is dealing with. He has some brilliant dialogue (see the best quite below) as he calls the townsfolk morons and halfwits, dolts, dunces, dullards and dumbbells... and Truman a hulking boob, chowder-head yokel, a blithering hayseed; Truman punching Rosenfield in face is a perfect punch the air moment. I certainly love Ferrer’s character but it was great to see him get his comeuppance and Cooper quickly step into to defend the Sheriff.

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The funeral of Laura Palmer is suitably tragic. Bobby and James finally come to blows and Leyland Palmer collapses on the coffin as it gets stuck lowering into the ground. Ray Wise plays a very said figure; his desperate attempt to get someone to dance with him at the Great Western at the end of the episode is heart-breaking.

And then we have the return of Sheryl Lee…as Maddie Ferguson, Laura Palmer’s cousin. Lee does a great job of playing someone so utterly different to blonde, popular Laura, with her dark frizzy hair and think glasses. We also learn that Norma’s psychotic husband is about to be release on parole; apparently one requirement to work at the RR Diner is a violent husband, though Shelly looks set to take things into her own hands by hiding a gun…that can’t end well.

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There is still a lot of plots spinning in the air and Twin Peaks manages it deftly. There is a real sense of progression and more mysteries coming to the fore; even knowing how things turn out I am eager to see where things go next.

Best Quote

Albert Rosenfield: “ Mr. Horne, I realize that your position in this fair community pretty well guarantees venality, insincerity, and a rather irritating method of expressing yourself. Stupidity, however, is not necessarily a inherent trait, therefore, please listen closely. You can have a funeral any old time. You dig a hole, you plant a coffin. I, however, cannot perform these tests next year, next month, next week or tomorrow - I must perform them now. I've got a lot of cutting and pasting to do, gentlemen, so why don't you please return to your porch rockers and resume whittling..”

And of course…

Sheriff Truman: “ I've had just about enough of you and your insults! .”
Albert Rosenfield: “ Oh yeah? Well, I've had about enough of this small town filled with morons and half wits, dolts, dunces, dullards and dumbbells... and you... you chowder-head yokel, you blithering hayseed. You've had enough of me?.”
Sheriff Truman: “ Yes, I have..”
[Truman punches Albert in the face]

Future episode observations – spoilers afoot…

After completing his tests, Albert tells Cooper and Truman that Laura Palmer was tied up twice at different locations at night of death, had cocaine on her, had sex with three men and had claw and bite marks on her body. The truth at what happened to her is becoming more disturbing each episode.

We’ve seen the Black Lodge in Cooper’s dream, but Truman’s remark that there is evil in the woods is the first instance that the local residents are aware of it.

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